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Homeostatic Interrelationship of Primary Respiratory System and Secondary Circular System

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Respiratory system supplies the body with oxygen. Respiratory system provides energy to the cells. Respiratory system is to remove carbon dioxide from the blood stream.

Circulatory System is an organ system that permits blood to circulate and transport nutrients (such as amino acids and electrolytes), oxygen, carbon dioxide, hormones, and blood cells to and from the cells in the body to provide nourishment and help in fighting diseases, stabilize temperature and pH, and maintain homeostasis. Circulatory system includes the lymphatic system. Respiratory surface is internalized as linings of the lungs. Anatomy of a typical respiratory system is the respiratory tract. The tract is divided into an upper and a lower respiratory tract. The upper tract includes the nose, nasal cavities, sinuses, pharynx and the part of the larynx above the vocal folds circulatory system of the blood is seen as having two components, a systemic circulation and a pulmonary circulation.

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Diseases/ Illness

Asthma chronic respiratory condition is caused by consistent inflammation of the airways. Symptoms include lung spasms with wheezing and shortness of breath. Allergies, infections and pollution can ignite an asthma attack.

Emphysema respiratory disease is another form of COPD according to the American Lung Association. The most common cause is smoking. Those who suffer from emphysema have trouble exhaling air from their lungs.

Cystic Fibrosis is genetic respiratory disease caused by a defective gene that creates thick and sticky mucus. This mucus causes repeated, and dangerous, lung infections as well as obstructions in the pancreas that prevent important enzymes from breaking down nutrients for the body. This disease affects 30,000 people in the United States, 75% of which were diagnosed by the age of two. In the 1950s, few children who had cystic fibrosis lived long enough to attend elementary school. Thanks to modern medicine, the life expectancy of a child with this respiratory disease has doubled. Symptoms of cystic fibrosis include salty-tasting skin, chronic coughing, frequent lung infections and a poor growth rate in children.

Atherosclerosis is literally, “hardening of the fatty stuff.” High fat diets can lead to formation of fatty plaques lining blood vessels. These fatty areas can become calcified and hard leading to arteriosclerosis, hardening of the arteries. When blood vessels become less stretchable, blood pressure rises and can result in heart and kidney damage and strokes.

Angina pectoris or literally called “pain in the chest.” But, this is a special kind of pain associated with the heart and is distinctive as “crushing, vise-like”, and often accompanied by shortness of breath, fatigue and nausea. Anginal pain indicates not enough blood is getting to the heart muscle, and the heart is protesting and begging for more. People with a history of angina often take nitroglycerine tablets to relieve the pain by increasing blood flow to the heart muscle.

Arrhythmia/dysrhythmia. Abnormal heart rates and rhythms all have special names like ventricular tachycardia, fibrillation, but generically are termed arrhythmias or dysrhythmia, meaning “no rhythm” and “abnormal rhythm.” There are fine distinctions between the two, but they are often used interchangeably.

Ischemia. Sometimes the heart muscle is not getting enough blood flow, more importantly, the oxygen the blood carries is insufficient to sustain muscle which has a very high metabolic rate, and oxygen demand. The term loosely means “not quite enough blood.”

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