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Sweatshops: Does The Sweat Pay Off?

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Thesis statement: Sweatshops may provide employment, but they not only have low wage rates and inhumane working conditions, but they also practice forced child labour.

1.Main Point: The wage rates in sweatshops in underdeveloped countries are very low. Some people work for as little as 1 US cent per hour. Apparel industry wages are low by U.S. standards, but they compare favourably with the average standard of living in these countries.

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2.Main Point: Men and women work in sweatshops for hours in filthy and inhumane conditions. the worst forms of sweatshops people are forced to work up to 72 hours straight, without sleep. Those complaining are beaten and abused.

3.Main Point: Child labour is a problem that is a rights abuse of children. These children are often subject to beatings and starvation from their employer and in some countries, children are either employed by the governing body of the nation forcibly.

Conclusion: Products made in sweatshops or by child labour must be prohibited from being sold in the United States due to the inhumane working conditions forced upon the Men, Women and children of this industry.

Over the past century, with the introduction of industrialization and globalization, sweatshops have become ever more prevalent around the world, but are the jobs worth the sweat? Sweatshops may provide employment, but they not only have low wage rates and inhumane working conditions, but they also practice forced child labour. Two popular sides of this issue include those that are opposed to the morals, or rather the lack thereof, of sweatshops, while others believe that the economic benefits of these shops are too good to set aside. Activists opposed to sweatshops propose “sweatshop labour ought to be legally prohibited, boycotted, regulated, prohibited by moral norms. No matter your beliefs about the dilemma of sweatshops, one thing is clear: extremist ideas without compromise will go nowhere. The author may think that women working in sweatshops in developing countries can be a positive experience, but I don’t think any form of forced labour cannot be a “positive experience”.

One of the largest dilemmas surrounding sweatshops is insufficient wages. Sweatshop wages can be so low that they barely cover essential needs. Some people work for as little as 1 US cent per hour, often more than 100 hours per week in conditions of poor air quality and extreme heat. In Bangladesh, garment workers make merely 0.6 per cent of a €29-product in total earnings, well below the living wage, according to a recent report from Accenture. In Bangladesh, 3.5 million workers in 4,825 garment factories produce goods for export to the global market, principally in Europe and North America. The Bangladeshi garment industry generates 80% of the country’s total export revenue. However, the wealth generated by this sector has led to few improvements in the lives of garment workers, 85% of whom are women.

Following the wages debate, the next big issue regarding sweatshops is the consideration of the working conditions available to the employees. Complaints of brutal working conditions have been mainstays in the debate over the ethics of sweatshops. Men and women work in sweatshops for hours in filthy and inhumane conditions. the worst forms of sweatshops people are forced to work up to 72 hours straight, without sleep. Those complaining are beaten and abused. Many sweatshops contain locked exits, which is a major safety hazard in the case of an emergency, a fire in New York’s Triangle Shirtwaist factory in 1911 exposed sweatshop conditions, killing 146 employees due to the locked exits. Recently, there has been much international attention focused on factory fires in Indonesia and Pakistan that have killed hundreds of people. According to September 2012 New York Times article by Declan Walsh, “Fire ravaged a textile factory complex in the commercial hub of Karachi early Wednesday, killing almost 300 workers trapped behind locked doors and raising questions about the woeful lack of regulation in a vital sector of Pakistan’s faltering economy.”

Sweatshops like employing children since they seldom complain about the working conditions and they are given a smaller wage. Rugs and Carpet manufacturers prefer children because of their small and fast hands. Child slavery is rampant in the Cocoa industry. Child labour is a problem that is a rights abuse to children. These children are often subject to beatings and starvation from their employer and in some countries, children are either employed by the governing body of the nation forcibly. Many types of shoes are made in sweatshops. However, the biggest problem is found with sneakers and athletic shoes. Most athletic shoes are made in sweatshops in Asian countries.

Products made in sweatshops or by child labour must be prohibited from being sold in the United States due to the inhumane working conditions forced upon the Men, Women and children of this industry. Child labour is a rights abuse to children harms the children of this industry in just more than physical ways. Sweatshops are inhumane working conditions that are very hazardous to the employees and their health. These forms of forced labour are plaguing the world and the products should not be sold in the United States.

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